Research Paper On Social Worker

Follow

Clinical Research Papers from 2017

PDF

Evaluating Child Maltreatment Prevention Programs & Services: A Qualitative Study, Laura Abrass

PDF

“I’m Tough, It’s Fine”: Prohibiting Restrictive Procedures and Seclusion in Educational Settings, Kaitlin Adams

PDF

Developmental Impact of Inclusion Classrooms on Autism Spectrum Disorder: A Systematic Review, Emily E. Aller

PDF

Involuntary Civil Commitment and Sobriety, Ana Anderson

PDF

A Case Study of Veteran Identity as a Female, Kimberly Anderson

PDF

Racial Differences in Veteran Service Connection Disability, Jonathan Arnold

PDF

A Qualitative Investigation of Parental Experiences with Play Therapy, Kaitlin Bach

PDF

Cognitive Behavior Therapy with Adults with Intellectual Disabilities: A Systematic Review, Crystal Barrera

PDF

Systematic Review of High School Dropout Prevention Programs, Dayne Bartlett

PDF

Removing Stigma and Reducing Anxiety: Social Work Professionals Integrating Essential Oils in Mental Healthcare Services with African American and Native American Clients, Kamara Bauman

PDF

What Can We Learn from Death and Dying? One Man’s Experience, Brooke K. Benson

PDF

Trauma in schools: Identifying and working with students who have experienced trauma, Amanda E. Berg

PDF

Unintended Rehabilitation: A Comparative Analysis of Prison Animal Programs, Mielissa Beseres

PDF

Understanding the Mental Health Impacts of Non-Kinship vs. Kinship Placements, Lena Bessas

PDF

Social Worker Perceptions on Education for Generalist and Specialist Roles, Jamie Blackledge

PDF

Strategies and Outcomes in Working with Adolescents Diagnosed with Conduct Disorder, Elisabeth A. Boegeman

PDF

Domestic Violence: How to Treat the Unseen Victims, Sarah Callahan

PDF

Birth Parents: Blogging The Emotional Journey Through Adoption, Kayla L. Christensen

PDF

Factors that Increase Successful Parenting Skills in Adult Survivors of Childhood Trauma, Neglect, and Abuse: A Systematic Review, Victoria A. Christian

PDF

Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Veterans Experiencing Insomnia: A Systematic Review, Dustin Cobb

PDF

Posttraumatic Growth in United States Military Veterans, Angela Cox

PDF

Examining Post-Adoption Services: What Adoptive Families Need for Beneficial Outcomes, Lindsey Crawford

PDF

Addressing Needs Among Students Affected by Domestic Violence: Social Workers’ Perspectives, Kiah Dahlquist

PDF

Making & Sustaining Change from Psychotherapy: A Mixed Method Study, Kelsi Dankey, Heather Karson, Arielle R. Yahnke, Sara Lemon, Tricia Downing, Danae Hoffman, and Natia Wilcek

PDF

What is the Impact of Mental Health Courts? A Systematic Literature Review, Rachel Dean

PDF

Evaluating the Effectiveness of Vocational Rehabilitation in Economic Outcomes for Adults with Disabilities, Susanne Desmond

PDF

Bicycles and Youth: Impacts, Elizabeth Drews

PDF

Lessons for Social Workers: A Review of the Latino/a Undocumented Immigrant Experience, Katie J. Ducklow

PDF

Intervention with Intimate Partner Violence: Application of Attachment and Personality Disorders, MaryBeth Ehlert

PDF

Transgenerational Transmission of Caregiver Behaviors Promoting Secure Attachments in American Indian Communities, Bryan Ellingson

PDF

Interventions to Alleviate the Psychosocial Needs of Hospice Family Caregivers: A Systematic Review, Nicole Engen

PDF

Spiritually Integrated Care for Veteran Trauma Survivors: A Quantitative Analysis, Krystle Englund

PDF

Guardian ad Litem Perceptions of Child Protection, Carla Evans

PDF

Factors Contributing to Success in Treatment for Individuals with a Dual Diagnosis, Logan Evenson

PDF

Mindfulness Practice with Children who have Experienced Trauma, Margaret Fischer

PDF

Officer-Involved Homicides of Unarmed Black Males: Perceptions of the African American Community, Sarah Fox

PDF

Intimacy after Sexual Trauma: Clinical Perspectives, Melissa Franckowiak

PDF

Interventions that Support Caregivers of Veterans with Traumatic Brain Injury: A Systematic Review, Melissa Franzen

PDF

Gaps in Mental Health Services in the Juvenile Justice System as Identified by Clinical Social Workers, Heather Fretty

PDF

Family Functioning and Secondary Traumatic Stress in Military Families: A Qualitative Study, Karlie Gams

PDF

Perceptions of Diagnosing and Treating Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder and Complex Trauma in Schools, Megan Gauer-Kloos

PDF

Clinician Support to Caregivers of Children with a Mental Health Disorder, Lauren Gavin

PDF

Effects of Yoga and Mindfulness-Based Practices on Stress and Anxiety in Children and Adolescents, Amanda Geldert

PDF

Identifying Protective Factors for Adult Children of Alcoholics, Jessica Goeke

PDF

Postpartum Depression and Opinions on Screening, Jana Gorman

PDF

Identifying and Mitigating Caregiver Burnout: The Role of Adult Day Social Workers, Annika Grafstrom

PDF

Work and Quality of Life for Individuals with SMI: A Systematic Review, Scott Grandt

PDF

Analysis of Implementing Trauma Informed Programs in Grade Schools, Lilli Gray

PDF

Making it Right in the End: Conflict on the Hospice Interdisciplinary Team, Sarah Green

PDF

Supports and Barriers Experienced by Female Same-Sex Couples When Planning For Life as They Age, Johanna Guerkink

PDF

Sacred Shame: Integrating Spirituality and Sexuality, Alyssa J. Haggerty

PDF

Welfare Reform and Quality of Life: A Systematic Review, Brianna Heilman

PDF

Alternate Endings: Insight into Alternative End of Life Care Options, Rachelle Henkel

PDF

An Exploration of Resilience and Post-traumatic Growth Following Traumatic Death, Shannon Henry

PDF

Contingency Management Effect on Cocaine Use While Using Methadone, Matthew Holkup

PDF

Fostering Resilience in Emancipating Foster Care Youth, Kelsey Howland

PDF

Services and Supports for Families of Children with Special Health Care Needs: Rural vs Urban Settings, Jackie Johnson

PDF

Foster Youth Transitioning to Adulthood, Jaclyn Jones

PDF

Emotional Dysregulation in Children, Alison Kath

PDF

Punishment, Pathology or Possibility: Caseworker Discretion, Mental Illness, and Welfare Sanctions, Andrew Kishel

PDF

Chronic Care Management Implementation, Nathan Klein

PDF

The Black Male Achievement Gap: Strategies for Intervention, Bryssa Koppie

PDF

Group Cognitive Processing Therapy for Veterans Experiencing Trauma: A Systematic Review, Rachel Kouba

PDF

Identifying Postpartum Mood Disorders in Men, Melissa Larson

PDF

Warrior Pose: Evaluation of Yoga Programming for Young Adults Experiencing Homelessness, Stacey Lillebo

PDF

The Common Benefits of School Based Mental Health Programs: A Systematic Review, Briana Lindsey

PDF

Assessing and Addressing Family Caregiver Burden: Palliative Care Social Work Perspective, Taylor Logeais

PDF

Systematic Literature Review: Programmatic Considerations for Grief Groups in Elementary Schools, Gabrielle Lottie

PDF

Assessing for Barriers Prior to Advance Directive Execution: A Descriptive Study of Social Work Practice Behaviors, Katherine Mackin

PDF

Practitioner Use of Neurofeedback in the Treatment of Children’s Mental Health, Andrea Markworth

PDF

Best Practices for School-Based Mentoring Programs: A Systematic Review, Rebecca McCoy

PDF

Factors Associated with Suicide Risk in Female Service Members and Veterans, Christine McDonough

PDF

The Body Recovers: Practitioner Perspective on Somatic Experiencing, Saoirse McMahon

PDF

Clinical Applications of Aerobic Exercise with Adolescents Experiencing Depression and Anxiety, Sarah Mergens

PDF

“Lost in Translation”: Medical Social Workers’ Perspectives on Using Interpreters, Amalia Mongiat

PDF

Police Officers and Mental Health: The Efficacy of CIT Training, Ian Morris

PDF

Psycho-Social Variables Contributing to Disparities of Hmong Students in Postsecondary Education, Mai Yang Moua

PDF

Use of Animal-Assisted Therapy on Veterans with Combat-related PTSD, Nicole Nelson

PDF

Moral Injury – The Lesser-Known Reality for Veterans: A Systematic Review, Ryan Normandin

PDF

The Role of Hope and Optimism in Breast Cancer Patients: A Systematic Review, Jennifer Novalany

PDF

Creation of the Myth The Lived Experience of Native Americans in Schools, Michael Olson

PDF

Fostering Awareness, Inclusivity, and Self-Efficacy: Facing Social and Internalized Recovery Stigma, Trinity Parker-Grewe

PDF

The Impact of Witnessing Domestic Violence on Children: A Systematic Review, Terra Pingley

PDF

Cultural Competency in Medical Social Work with Elders, Alexandra Pray

PDF

Residency Status and Discrimination among Immigrants in Minnesota, Lisa J. Rawlins

PDF

Social Work or Social Control: Power, and the Values and Contradictions in Social Work Practice and the American Indian, Kayla Richards

PDF

Engagement of Latino Mental Health: Voices from Professionals in the Minnesota Community, Maria Rios

PDF

Adolescent Yoga: Goals and Settings in Therapeutic Practice, Alison Roberts

PDF

How Mental Health Service Delivery Models Address The Needs of Refugees, Sarah Rogers

PDF

Music Therapy in the Treatment of Adolescents with Emotional and Behavioral Disorder: A Systematic Review, Aubrie Roley

PDF

School Based Interventions for School-Aged Children with Oppositional Defiant Disorder: A Systematic Review, Kelly Ross

PDF

Grief as a Skill, Michael Sadowsky

PDF

The Impact of Diet and Nutrition on Adolescent Depression: A Systematic Review, Rachel Samuelson

PDF

Financial Fraud on Elders and Interventions, Molly Schuneman

PDF

A Systematic Review of the Primary Material Hardships of Post-Welfare Reform TANF Recipients, Matthew Schwer

PDF

Clinical Interventions that Reduce Recidivism among Female Offenders: A Systematic Review, Brittani Senser

PDF

Professional Satisfaction within the Mental Health System, Mary Pat Seter

PDF

View of Self and Its Effects on Higher Educational Goals in Mexican-American Youth, Rebekah Simpson

PDF

The Benefits of Non-Pharmacological Interventions for Individuals with Dementia: A Systematic Review, Nicole Sintler

PDF

Choose Your Own Ending: An Arts-Informed Action Research on Creating a “Good Death”, Molli Slade

 

Select a specific research method and critically evaluate its usefulness to researching in/for social work.

It is not unusual for practitioners and students to become anxious about the prospect of undertaking social research. The reputation of research is difficult, mechanical and a tedious set of rituals that are linked to unappealing scientific or objective routines and tasks which ultimately result in remote, dry and even aloof as well as impenetrable, reports, books, and academic papers. Although challenging, most forms of qualitative research are accessible, rewarding, relevant, and at times, enlightening. Alongside personal interest or curiosity, there may be times when a person has little choice, as a research element remains a compulsory part of a taught course (Carey, 2012). Many of the core skills required for qualitative research will have been developed or mastered by many students and practitioners. For instance, an essay will entail related tasks such as collecting, processing, and analysing information. Furthermore, social work practitioners conduct interviews in assessments or write reports for funding panels or reports for court proceedings. Moreover, qualitative research is learned just as much through direct experience as through study and can help promote our imagination and sense of creativity or curiosity and the urge to know more (Shaw, 2012).
According to the Social Work Policy Institute (2010), social work research informs professional practice. Social work research allows the professional to assess the needs and resources of people in their environments, evaluate the effectiveness of social work services in meeting people’s needs, demonstrate relative costs and benefits of social work services, advance professional education in light of changing contexts for practice, and understand the impact of legislation and social policy on the clients and communities served. In the field of social work, practitioners must remain well-informed regarding any research advances in their respective areas. Advocates of evidence-based practice expect social workers to engage in practice informed by the best available evidence. Research studies conducted through the lens of qualitative studies provide important contributions to the social work knowledge base. In many cases, these studies can represent the best available research regarding emerging problems or application of evidence to diverse populations (Lietz & Zayas, 2010). Qualitative research continues to be a valuable approach in social work practice. In 1994, the Council on Social Work Education required that qualitative research methods be taught in all accredited bachelor’s and master’s level social work programs, a requirement renewed in the Education Policy and Accreditation Standards in 2002 and again in 2008 (Drisko, 2013).
A universal definition of  does not exist. The literature of social science and applied professional fields, such as interpretive, naturalistic, constructivist, ethnographic, and fieldwork are variously employed to designate the broad collection of approaches that are simply qualitative research (Hunt, 2004). Qualitative research approaches allow researchers to connect with people in deeply personal ways that enable the persons being researched to express the rich meanings of their thoughts, actions, and events in their lives. The two main types of qualitative methods, in-depth interviews and observation, brings researchers into close contact with the lived experiences of the people being researched. These interactions frequently involve personal topics that can evoke powerful emotions for both the researcher and informants. These evocative situations provide researchers the opportunity to explore the deep meanings of the phenomena as well as develop new theories and understandings that have rich and nuanced dimensions. Therefore, the knowledge gained is not only information that passes through the central processors of the brain, but also arises from our hearts and deeply held emotions. Therefore, understandings gained via the engagement of heart and mind have an immediate potential to connect to the hearts and minds of audiences. This immediacy can be beneficial to persons who are members of social work constituencies such as maltreated children, poor people of colour, homeless families, people with mental illnesses and frail elderly who are disenfranchised from the political system and whose voices are regularly suppressed within the arenas where their fates are debated and shaped: public opinion, legislatures, and social service agencies (Gilgun & Abrams, 2002).
The commitment of qualitative social work practice to the empowerment of the disenfranchised population is commendable. Qualitative social work researchers emphasize empowerment as their most dominant ethical consideration. Yet, empowerment is often an exclusive ethical principle. The exclusiveness of the empowering research trend can be understood from two contemporary perspectives: the nature of social work and the lack of a specific code of ethics and training in ethics for qualitative social work researchers. Most social work is not basic research. Instead, social work is an ideology committed discipline in which practitioners and researchers have a duty to promote justice and improve welfare. The concept of empowerment allows social work researchers, particularly qualitative researchers, to work towards these goals via their research. Furthermore, by empowering research participants and related populations, social work researchers can bridge a gap that might exist between their value commitments as social workers and a lack of training on research ethics. Therefore, empowerment offers social work researchers the opportunity to be ethical according to current mainstream thinking in social work. The trend to emphasize empowerment in qualitative social work studies reveals merits and some limitations, as researchers often emphasize successful or resilient individuals within oppressed groups studied. The dual focus on resiliency and empowerment contributes to research participants as role models of successful coping within their communities. Simultaneously, it overshadows the stories of the multitudes of ordinary unfortunate members of these oppressed or disenfranchised populations. The target of most empowerment studies is to increase the social power of populations and not the research participants themselves, resilient or not (Peled & Leichtentritt, 2002).
A number of advantages have been documented about the use of qualitative methodologies for social work. For example, descriptive, inductive, and unobtrusive techniques for data collection are regarded as compatible with the knowledge and values of the social work profession. In circumstances where social workers are faced with issues and problems that are not amenable to quantitative examination, qualitative methods have been advocated. The social’psychological bases of qualitative research suggest that it is compatible with the person-in-environment paradigm of social work practice. Qualitative approaches are similar in method to clinical social work assessments, as clinicians rely on interviews to gather data on a client’s issues in the context of the environment. The clinician reviews a series of hunches and working hypotheses that are based on observations made through ongoing contact with the client. Qualitative researchers, like clinicians, are trained to investigate each case individually, without imposing preconceived notions or attempting to generalize to all clients having a particular problem. Qualitative researchers maintain field notes and documents on their research, just as clinicians maintain running accounts of contact with a client in the form of process recordings or case records. In studies of social processes of complex human systems such as families, organizations, and communities, qualitative methodology may be the most appropriate research strategy. Scholars of the family now extol the benefits of qualitative methodologies in gaining, or understanding, the dynamic processes, meanings, communication patterns, experiences, and individual and family constructions of reality. Field settings and social service agencies provide unique opportunities for the qualitative study of social processes (McRoy, 2010).
Qualitative approaches have the advantage of flexibility and, in-depth analysis, as well as the potential to observe a variety of features of a social situation. Qualitative researchers conducting face-to-face interviews can quickly adjust the interview schedule if the interviewee’s responses suggest the need for additional probes or lines of inquiry in future interviews. Moreover, qualitative researchers can develop and use questions on the spot which can aid in a more in-depth understanding of a respondent’s beliefs, attitudes, or situation. During the course of an interview or observation, a researcher is able to note changes in bodily expression, mood, voice intonation, and environmental factors that could influence the interviewee’s responses. This observational data can be especially valuable when a respondent’s body language runs counter to verbal responses given to interview questions. Nevertheless, qualitative methodology is not completely precise because human beings do not always act logically or predictably (McCoy, 2010).
Qualitative research is frequently based on the researcher’s interpretations or judgements. Interpretations are by nature very personal and influenced by the researcher’s own values and individual biases. These criticisms are considered subjectivity. Therefore, qualitative research findings cannot be replicated in the same way as quantitative results. For example, two qualitative researchers, one with a more pessimistic viewpoint and one with a more optimistic viewpoint, both studying the same phenomenon and interviewing the same individuals, may attain different conclusions because the interpretive process would be impacted by their dissimilar world views. However, it should be noted that a primary emphasis on designing rigorous qualitative studies helps to minimize researcher bias. Qualitative research findings do not generalize to populations beyond the sample. This is due to the subjectivity of the results and because they are so specific to the sample. Generalizability is not the aim of qualitative research because the goal of qualitative research is to develop a rich understanding of an aspect of human experience. As the aim of qualitative research is understanding rather than generalization, data collection continues as saturation occurs. Saturation occurs with relatively small sample sizes of 30, 20 or 10 participants (Krysik & Finn, 2013).
A risk of betrayal can result from the greater closeness, and consequent trust may develop between the researcher and participant in qualitative research. The risk of betrayal increases because of the characteristic use of smaller samples and the emphasis on the details of how people live their lives (Shaw, 2008). Qualitative research evokes consideration about confidentiality and the protection of participant identity. Ethical questions arise due to the special closeness that may develop between qualitative researchers and study participants. Since participant observation is a key methodology, the researcher must explain how he or she plans to address the issue of non-consenting members of the group. It is not unusual for qualitative researchers to investigate ‘hidden’ populations who engage in behaviour defined as deviant. Applicants studying individuals who may be subject to legal sanctions if their identities are revealed will need to specify procedures to ensure confidentiality (National Institute of Health, 2001).

Although time, budgetary, and other resource constraints may impact qualitative research, these constraints should not be allowed to undermine it. Other important considerations must be considered such as the data collection method, as well as, the human resources available to the project and their skills must be taken into account (Wilmot, 2005). Qualitative research can require an enormous amount of time and be extremely labour intensive. It can also produce results that may not be generalizable for policy-making or decision making, and many funding sources think it may be simply too expensive (Trochim, 2006). The democratization of social work research is one direction in which the politics of the research have moved centre-stage. The belated increase in the awareness of research funders that qualitative research makes an important and distinctive contribution to policy, practice, and strategic research poses new challenges to qualitative researchers to address ethical issues in a persuasive and original way when applying for funding (Shaw, 2008).

Qualitative methods are particularly suitable for use with people who are more comfortable responding in an interview format than to a standardized survey questionnaire. It has been suggested that the gender of respondents should be a consideration in selecting a research strategy because many women may prefer qualitative research techniques to quantitative approaches as they favour opportunities to discuss subjects in context. Additionally, some members of ethnic groups, low income populations, or people who are socially distant from the researcher are more likely to participate in the in-depth interviews characteristic of qualitative research than to complete a structured questionnaire or survey. To enhance the validity of results in research with diverse populations, research questions must be clearly constructed and must not be subject to different cultural interpretations. Moreover, due to the subjective nature of qualitative research, it is important for the researcher to continually engage in self-examination to be certain that his or her own biases and stereotypes are not influencing the interpretation of the findings. On the other hand, because qualitative analysis allows researchers to explore in depth all factors that might affect a particular issue, this strategy permits sensitive consideration of the complexities of human diversity (McCoy, 2010). Then again, when compared with surveys and experiments, qualitative research measurements normally provide more depth of meaning but have less reliability. Also, qualitative research results cannot be generalized as safely as those based on rigorous sampling and standardized questionnaires (Rubin & Babbin, 2009).
Prolonged engagement is used to reduce the impact of reactivity and respondent bias. It is assumed that a long and trusting relationship between a researcher and respondent gives the respondents less opportunity to deceive and is therefore less likely to withhold information and lie. Plus, lengthy interviews or follow-up interviews with the same respondent enables the researcher to detect distortion or the respondent to disclose socially undesirable truths. However, there are drawbacks to prolonged engagement as lengthy engagement can lead to bias if the researcher over-identifies with the respondent and lose his or her objective, analytic stance, or own sense of identity. The term for this narrative is going native. Notwithstanding, qualitative studies that lack prolonged engagement should be viewed with caution as some authors think that because qualitative inquiries emphasizes flexibility, the label ‘qualitative’ means ‘anything goes’. The most common example occurs when a researcher thinks that one brief open- ended interview with each respondent is satisfactory (Rubin & Babbie, 2009, p.233). Another decisive factor in whether the qualitative research report provides sufficient detail about the study’s contexts and participants is to enable readers in other situations to determine if the findings seem likely to apply to the contexts or populations with which they are concerned. Researchers using qualitative observation must fuse two paradoxical perspectives. The first is the emic perspective in which they attempt to adopt the beliefs, attitudes, and other points of view shared by the members of the culture being studied. The second is the etic perspective which means maintaining objectivity as an outsider and raising questions about the culture being observed that would not occur to members of that culture (Rubbin & Babbin, 2009).
In conclusion, it is true that many people dislike the thought of researching, yet it is also true that once research is initiated, it can be become addictive as the researchers thirst for knowledge is awakened. It is a positive attribute that quantitative research engages with hard-to-reach populations and offers insight in extremely complex and often hidden social problems. It gives oppressed populations a voice that can pave the way for social inclusion and social justice.

 

0 Replies to “Research Paper On Social Worker”

Lascia un Commento

L'indirizzo email non verrà pubblicato. I campi obbligatori sono contrassegnati *