Essay Scorer Reedley

For additional information on program requirements, refer to the specific financial aid program below:


Federal Pell Grant

  • Award is a need-based grant
  • For students who have not yet received a bachelor’s degree
  • Amount varies from student to student and are awarded on an annual basis
  • Payments are prorated based on the number of units actively enrolled in and attending
  • Each student has a lifetime limit of up to six, full-time annual Pell Grant awards, or 600%
Federal Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grant (FSEOG)
  • Award is need-based grant
  • Amount varies from student to student and is awarded once every academic school year
  • Payment is based on number of units enrolled in and attending, and are paid via check or direct deposit generally twice per semester

Federal Work Study

  • Awarded to student who indicate on their FAFSA that they are interested in student employment
  • Offered on a first come/first served basis until all funds are exhausted
  • Requires at least six units of enrollment and is paid via check or direct deposit on the 10th of each month
  • Maintain satisfactory academic progress to receive payment

Federal Direct Student Loans

  • Must be repaid
  • Must be enrolled in at least six units of non-remedial/non-ESL coursework
  • In addition to completed file, student must complete online entrance counseling and sign promissory note.
  • Maintain satisfactory academic progress to receive payment

Board of Governors (BOG) Fee Waiver

  • You must be coded by Admissions and Records as a California Resident or AB-540 student (contact A&R for residency questions)
  • Awarded automatically if you have an accepted FAFSA on file with FCC and you meet income requirements
  • Also can be awarded by filling out a paper BOG application in the main financial aid office if:
    • You meet certain income standards or
    • You or your family are receiving public assistance from the Aid to Families with Dependent Children (AFDC), Temporary Assistance to Needy Families (TANF), Supplemental Security Income (SSI), or General Assistance or
    • You have certification from the California Department of Veterans' Affairs or the national Guard Adjutant General for a dependent's fee waiver or

Regulations Effective Fall 2015

    • Must sustain a cumulative GPA of 2.0 or higher
    • Must complete more than 50 percent of your cumulative coursework
    • If you are below these standards for two consecutive terms (summer excluded), you may lose your fee waiver eligibility

General Cal Grant Eligibility Requirements

  • Be a California Resident or AB 540 eligible
  • Be a U.S. Citizen or eligible non-citizen or AB 540 eligible
  • Males must meet Selective Service requirements
  • Attend a Cal Grant eligible school
  • Not have earned a bachelor’s degree
  • Not be in grant repayment or in default on a student loan
  • Not be incarcerated
  • Enroll at least half-time to receive payment
  • Maintain satisfactory academic progress to receive payment

Cal Grant High School Entitlement Award

For current high school seniors and recent high school graduates
Who is considered for a High School Entitlement Award:

  • Current High school seniors and last year’s high school graduates
  • Students who meet the general Cal Grant eligibility requirements

Deadline to Apply

  • Deadline is March 2nd of each award year

How to Apply

Once you submit your completed FAFSA/DAA and high school GPA you will be considered for the appropriate Cal Grant award based on GPA, financial need and college of attendance.

Cal Grant A

  • For low to middle income students
  • 3.00 high school GPA minimum
  • May be used for an academic program that is 2-4 years in length
  • Can only be used for tuition and fees
  • If awarded at a California Community College, will be held in reserve up to two years until student transfers to a 4-year school

Cal Grant B

  • For low income students
  • 2.00 high school GPA minimum
  • May be used for an academic program that is at least 1 year in length
  • Includes an additional annual Access Award amount (living expenses)
  • California Community College Students with 12 units or more may qualify for an augmented Cal Grant B Access award. Amount will vary depending on the number of qualifying students. Check with the Financial Aid office to see if you qualify for the increased Access Award.

Cal Grant Competitive Awards

For students who are not eligible for the Cal Grant Entitlement awards
Who is considered for a Competitive Award:

  • Students who are not awarded a Cal Grant Entitlement award.
  • Students who meet the general Cal Grant eligibility requirements.
  • Students who complete a Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA).

Deadline to Apply: (12,875 Awards offered each deadline)

  • CA Community College, CSU, UC or eligible Private College Students March 2nd
  • CA Community College Students Only September 2nd

How to Apply

  • Complete a FAFSA by the stated deadline.
  • Submit a verified GPA to the California Student Aid Commission by the stated deadline (FCC will submit your GPA electronically for you if you may qualify).

This is a competitive award and limited to 25,750 awards each academic year. Students who are awarded a competitive award must claim their awards electronically using WebGrants for Students. Students are selected for this award based on information from their FAFSA and their GPA. These awards are not currently available to Dream Applicants.Students are scored based on information provided on their FAFSA and their GPA. Scoring components include: GPA, parent education level, access equalizer, student or parent household status, family income and household size.12,875 competitive awards are offered to students who meet the March 2 filing deadline. 12,875 competitive awards are offered to students who are enrolled at a California Community College for the fall term and have a GPA reported by the September 2 filing deadline.

California Community College Students with 12 units or more may qualify for an augmented Cal Grant B Access award. Amount will vary depending upon number of qualifying students. Check with your CCC campus to see if you qualify for the increased Access Award.


Dream Act

Not a US Citizen or Permanent resident? Want to apply for financial aid, but cannot apply for federal aid due to your immigration status? Have you attended a California High School for three full years and graduated from a California High School or received your GED or passed the high school equivalency exam in California? You may be eligible for state financial aid under the California Dream Act. Read on!

Current FCC Students

Did you graduate in 2015, but were not awarded a Cal Grant? Complete a 2016-2017 Dream Act Applicationand check with your high school to verify your GPA was submitted. Both should be submitted by March 2nd to be considered for your high school entitlement Cal Grant.

Current High School Seniors

Complete a 2016 – 2017 Dream Act Application for a Board of Governor’s Fee Waiver and for Cal Grant competitive awards. For more information, read on and visit www.caldreamact.org.

Until the passage of the Dream Act, undocumented students were not eligible for federal, state or university funded financial aid. Under this new law, undocumented students who qualify under AB 540 criteria may now be eligible for certain types of financial aid. The California Dream Act Application is used to determine a student's eligibility for need-based financial aid. For detailed information on the California Dream Act, please visit csac.ca.gov/dream_act.asp. Additional information is also available in UC Santa Barbara's California Dream Application Tutorial.

What is the California Dream Act?

The Dream Act is really two laws that were passed in 2011 and allow AB 540 students to apply for and receive several types of financial aid, including:

  • Board of Governors Fee Waivers
  • State financial aid like Cal Grants and Chafee Grants
  • Assistance from EOPS, CARE or CalWORKs
  • Privately-funded scholarships

Check with your college financial aid, scholarship, EOPS/CARE and CalWORKs offices to see what is available.


EOPS

EOPS was created in 1969 to enable low income, educationally disadvantaged students “affected by language, social, and economic handicaps” to achieve a college education. EOPS has continuously provided guidance, motivation, support services and resources to help students complete their educational goals, including vocational certificates, associate degrees and transfer to four-year institutions.

  • Support Services
  • EOPS Grants
  • Book Vouchers
  • Academic Counseling
  • Tutorial Services
  • C.A.R.E. (Childcare Assistance for Single Parents on TANF

CalWorks

The California Work Opportunities and Responsibility to Kids program at Madera Community College Centerley College is designed to help recipients of cash aid get through college in a short amount of time, with special services that make it easy. If you receive cash aid from a county welfare department, have children, and are enrolled in college or want to sign up for college, you can participate in CalWORKs at Madera Community College Centerley College or at Clovis, Madera or Oakhurst Centers.

Finally, you can go to school and not worry about child care. While you attend classes and educational activities, you may be able to leave your infant or toddler on campus with the Madera Community College Centerley College Child Care Program. You'll get priority acceptance for enrollment.

Upon referral to the college, CalWORKs participants will attend an orientation conducted by Madera Community College Centerley College CalWORKs staff. Students will receive information about the requirements and expectations. At that time, an appointment is scheduled with a CalWORKs counselor. The counselor will assist the student with registering for school, determining a class schedule, and providing support and guidance through the academic experience. Students are required to meet with the CalWORKs counselor at least once every semester to maintain eligibility.


Scholarships

  • The new Scholarship Listing, which includes all Madera Community College Centerley College scholarships and their criteria, is available each January on our website under Scholarship Opportunities
  • Scholarship applications must be submitted by March 2 of each year to be considered for scholarships the following academic year
  • You must have a Social Security number or a Madera Community College Centerley College ID number to apply
  • Most scholarships require at least 12 units of enrollment, unless otherwise stated (Registered Nursing, Dental Hygiene, and Radiologic Technology scholarships require at least nine units)
  • The application will require you to type a one-page, single-spaced personal statement or essay. You will also need two recommendations provided by people in professional positions (teacher, counselor, employer, doctor, social worker, etc.)

About 300 students from 24 high schools in Fresno County completed the 36th Annual Fresno County Academic Decathlon on Saturday, as many tackled the Super Quiz and ended the night with an award ceremony at Central High School-East Campus.

The two-weekend long decathlon started Jan. 27 with testing in skills that included speech, ability to conduct and undergo an interview, and essay writing. The Feb. 3 portion of the decathlon included testing in math, social science, science, economics, language and literature, art, and music. The last competition was the Super Quiz, which was the only activity open to the public. All exam questions, except for math, were related to this years theme, which was “Africa.”

“The Super Quiz is one of 10 academic activities that our students participate in,” said Jim Yovino, Fresno County superintendent of schools. “This is kind of like the Super Bowl of decathlon.”

Decathlon teams were made up of 12 students, but for the Super Quiz, up to nine students from each team were picked to compete. The nine students in each team were then divided into three divisions — Varsity, Scholastic and Honor, resulting in each school having three sub-teams in the Super Quiz. Each sub-team had up to three members.

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The Super Quiz was divided into three rounds — the first round consisting Varsity students, who were considered as “C” and below students; the second round consisting Scholastic students, who were considered as “B” students; and the third round consisting Honors students, who were considered as “A” students.

A total of 14 questions were asked by the event’s quizmaster, KMPH Fox 26 news anchor Rich Rodriguez, during each round. Students had 10 seconds to correspond with their teammates to answer all non-math related questions and 20 seconds to answer math questions. “These young men and women worked all year long to compete today. This isn’t just a couple of months of practice, they have dedicated an entire year,” Yovino said. “I’m just really proud of our students in Fresno County.”

University High School continued its winning streak by scoring 51,371.0 — scoring 1,716.9 more points than last year. This is their seventh win in the county decathlon. They have also won the National Decathlon small school championship 10 times.

Edison High School fell short 680.5 points less than University, placing second with 50,690.5 points. Bullard High had the third highest score with 41,345.2 points.

Kings, Madera and Tulare counties also completed the decathlon Saturday. Lemoore Middle College High School placed first with 48,618.3 points in Kings County; Yosemite High School placed first in Madera County with 33,039.6 points; and Granite Hills High School placed first in Tulare County.

The winning team from each county will compete in the California State Decathlon from March 22-25 in Sacramento. The state championship team will advance to the National Decathlon in April in Frisco, Texas.

FRESNO COUNTY

Superintendent’s Sweepstake Award: University High, 51,371.0 points

Division 1 winners: First place, University High, 51,371.0 points; second place, Edison High, 50,690.5 points; Bullard High, 41,345.2 points

Division 2 winners: First place, Fowler High, 39,895.1 points; second place, Sanger High, 37,652.2 points; third place, Sunnyside High, 37,131.9 points

Division 3 winners: First place, Firebaugh High, 40,534.9 points; second place, Clovis West High, 37,678.2 points; third placeDuncan Polytechnical, 36,320.9

Division 4 winners: First place, Washington Union, 26,789.2 points; second place, Caruthers High, 25,150.0 points; third place, Cambridge High, 24,771.0 points

Overall winners: First place, University High, 51,371.0 points; second place, Edison High, 50,690.5 points; third place, Bullard High, 41,345.2 points; fourth place, Firebaugh High, 40,534.9 points; fifth place, Fowler High, 39,895.1 points; sixth place, Clovis West High, 37, 678.2 points; seventh place, Sanger High, 37,652.2 points; eighth place, Sunnyside High, 37,131.9; ninth place, Duncan Polytechnical, 36,320.9 points; 10th place, Reedley High, 35,841.9 points.

Most improved team: Duncan Polytechnical

Super Quiz: First place, University High, 5,250.0 points; second place, Edison High and Bullard High, 4,690.0 points; third place, Firebaugh High, 4,410.0 points; forth place, Duncan Polytechnical, 4,340.0 points; fifth place, Fowler High, 4,130.0 points;

Dean’s Medalists (highest scoring students): First place, Madeleine Fischer, Edison High, 9,209.3 points; second place, Daniel Clark, Edison High, 9,066.6; third place, Sumanjit Gill, Edison High, 8,799.4 points.

KINGS COUNTY

Winning decathlon team: Lemoore Middle College High School, 48,618.3 points.

Overall winners: First place, Lemoore Middle College High School, 48618.3 points; second place Lemoore High School, 35,017.2 points; third place,Hanford West High School, 29,611 points; fourth place, Sierra Pacific High School, 27,165.5 points; fifth place, Corcoran High School, 26,661.9 points; sixth place Hanford High School, 21,754.3 points; seventh place, Avenal High School, 10,683.6 points

Top Decathlete: Randen Banuelos, Lemoore Middle College High School, $1,000 scholarship; Top Varsity Student: William Young, Lemoore Middle College High School, $500 scholarship; Top Scholastic Student: Josephine Andrade, Lemoore Middle College High School, $500 scholarship; Top Honors Student: Randen Banuelos, Lemoore Middle College High School, $500 scholarship

Top students from each Academic Decathlon category: Language and Literature, Sara Grever, Hanford West High School; Language and Literature, Randen Banuelos, Lemoore Middle College High School; Music, Randen Banuelos, Lemoore Middle College High School; Science, Randen Banuelos, Lemoore Middle College High School; Art, Sara Grever, Hanford West High School; Mathematics, Christopher Acevedo, Lemoore Middle College High School; Math, Arijeet Grewal, Sierra Pacific High School; Economics, Sara Grever, Hanford West High School; Social Science, Nathalia Desouza, Lemoore Middle College High School; Social Science, Christopher Acevedo, Lemoore Middle College High School; Essay, William Young, Lemoore Middle College High School; Speech, Joseph Ramirez, Lemoore High School; Interview, Ashley Pappilli, Corcoran High School

MADERA COUNTY

Winning decathlon team: Yosemite High School, 33,039.6 points

Overall winners: First place, Yosemite High School, 33,039.6 points; second place Chowchilla High School; third place, Liberty High School

Super Quiz: Madera South High School

Top Decathlete: Caleb Lynch, Chawanakee Academy Charter, 7,747.6 points

Senior honors: Benjamin Johnson, Chawanakee Academy Charter; Anna Nomicos, Chowchilla Union High School; Holly Hiatt, Liberty High School; Jacob Diaz, Madera High School; Alejandra Flores, Madera South High School; Olivia Mattos, Yosemite High School

TULARE COUNTY

Winning decathlon team: Granite Hills High School, Team #2 (Porterville)

Top scoring team, large school category: Granite Hills High School, Team #2 (Porterville)

Top scoring team, small school category: Orosi High School, Team #5 (Orosi)

Super Quiz: Porterville Charter Schools (with students from Butterfield Charter High School and Harmony Magnet Academy)

Top students from each Academic Decathlon category: Art, Ying Yan, El Diamante High School (Visalia); Economics, Ryan Cometa, Porterville Charter Schools; Literature, Mae Vercnocke, Porterville Charter Schools; Math, Ryan Cometa, Porterville Charter Schools; Music, William Lancaster, El Diamante High School (Visalia); Science, Meera Kashyap, Porterville Charter Schools; Social Science, Ying Yan, El Diamante High School (Visalia); Essay, Ethan Jarocki, El Diamante High School (Visalia); Interview, Mackinzie Thomason, Granite Hills High School (Porterville); Speech, Denise Rodriguez, Granite Hills High School (Porterville)

Top students by division: Honors, Ying Yan, El Diamante High School (Visalia); Scholastic, Alyza Boriphanvichitr, El Diamante High School (Visalia); Varsity, Gwenyth English, Granite Hills High School (Porterville)

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